Nov 13, 2019  
2018-2019 Undergraduate Bulletin 
    
2018-2019 Undergraduate Bulletin [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


All courses are offered yearly, upon sufficient demand, unless indicated otherwise. Those courses offered on an alternate-year basis have the next academic year of availability indicated by a date within parentheses immediately following the course description.

Courses may be offered in a variety of formats, including online.

Although the course generally will be offered on a regular basis, the university reserves the right to introduce or delete courses, depending on sufficient demand.

Those courses graded on a Pass/No Credit basis only are indicated by P/NC.

Institutional credit only (S/NC) does not give graduation credit but does count toward full loads.

The fourth digit in the course number indicates the number of semester credit hours.

 

Early Childhood and Family Studies

  
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    ECFS 2743 The Study of Young Children

    3 credits
    This course focuses on the study of the young child in family and society, including the impact of environmental, cultural and socioeconomic influences. An understanding of the physical, cognitive and affective areas of development and theories and principles which relate to children from birth to six years old is covered.
  
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    ECFS 2843 Observation and Assessment

    3 credits
    Practical and theoretical aspects of observing young children are studied for the purpose of influencing curriculum and providing appropriate and individualized support.
  
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    ECFS 3743 Curriculum and Instruction in ECE

    3 credits
    Program planning, strategic design, and a practical foundation for teaching and learning in early childhood environments. Methods and materials for an early learning curriculum with an emphasis on the growth, development, learning and individual differences in designing learning experiences for children from two to six years old.
  
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    ECFS 3843 Parent Education

    3 credits
    This course is designed to increase the understanding of concepts and theories related to diverse families and how parents teach, guide and influence the development of children and adolescents.
  
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    ECFS 4343 Organization and Administration of ECE Programs

    3 credits
    The course addresses responsibilities, issues, functions involved in developing and administering early childhood programs. Included are types of programs, staffing, scheduling, financing, environmental design, equipment, evaluation and licensure and regulation requirements.
  
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    ECFS 4646 Child and Family Internship I

    6 credits
    This course is designed to provide students with a practical site-based experience in settings serving children and families. A total of twelve full time weeks (six weeks @ 35 hours) for a total of 420 clock hours is required. Note:  Approval to register from Coordinator of the Early Childhood and Family Studies program required.
  
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    ECFS 4656 Child and Family Internship II

    6 credits
    This course is designed to provide students with a practical site-based experience in settings serving children and families. A total of twelve full time weeks (six weeks @ 35 hours) for a total of 420 clock hours is required. Note:  Approval to register from Coordinator of the Early Childhood and Family Studies program required.

Early Childhood Education

  
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    EDRS 3053 R2S Foundations in Reading ECE/ELE

    3 credits
    This Read to Succeed course will outline the theories of leading reading researchers, combined with those of practitioners of various fields, to provide a comprehensive look at reading in today’s classroom. Numerous articles from the fields of special education, sociology, bilingual education, and linguistics will be used to discuss how reading has been historically taught, the disciplines that have contributed to each paradigm shift, and the new arenas into which the field is migrating. The emphasis will be on the interrelationships among reading, writing, listening, and speaking. Prerequisite:  Acceptance into Lock 1.
  
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    EDRS 3073 R2S Content Area Reading and Writing for ECE/ELE

    3 credits
    This Read to Succeed course will explore methods of improving knowledge and skills in the early childhood, elementary, and special education content areas by implementing strategies, instructional approaches, materials and a balanced curriculum to develop language literacy skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening). A variety of assessment tools and practices to plan and evaluate effective reading and writing skills for the diverse K-5 students will be examined that fosters reading and writing. Prerequisite:  Acceptance into Lock 1.
  
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    EDRS 4043 R2S Methods and Instructional Practices for Reading ECE/ELE

    3 credits
    This is a R2S course designed to demonstrate to participants instructional approaches and materials that will assist with implementing an integrated, comprehensive, and balanced curriculum to support student learning in reading and writing in K-5. The participants will be able to design and implement a complete and balanced curriculum while using content knowledge; implement appropriate and varied instructional strategies; understand the value of the K-5 student’s background and prior knowledge; make connections for reading and writing with other disciplines. Required of all early childhood, elementary education, and special education teacher candidates. (Fall) Prerequisite: Acceptance into Lock 1 (Fall semester)
  
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    EDRS 4053 R2S Assessment of Reading ECE/ELE with Field Experience

    3 credits
    This is a R2S course designed to assist participants broaden and deepen their understanding of the reading and writing progression with assessment and evaluation of the reading and writing processes. Participants will have a repertoire of different types of assessments and their characteristics; formative and summative assessments and the administration and interpretation; the use of assessment information to plan, evaluate, and adapt instruction; and the communication of assessment results and implications to varied audiences. This course includes a 15-hour field experience. Required of all early childhood and elementary education teacher candidates. Included in this course will be 36 hours of field placement experience. (Spring) Prerequisite: EDRS 4043; Acceptance into Lock 1 (Spring semester)

Education

  
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    EDUC 1003 American Sign Language I

    3 credits
    Focuses on major language functions used in everyday conversation. The basics of ASL grammar structure, the manual alphabet, and other vocabulary are also taught. (Fall, Even Years)
  
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    EDUC 1013 American Sign Language II

    3 credits
    Focuses on fluency, correct structuring of the language, and competency in expressive as well as receptive communication skills. Includes additional vocabulary. (Spring, Odd Years) Prerequisite: EDUC 1003  or demonstrated ASL competency
  
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    EDUC 1153 Teacher Cadet

    3 credits
    Students completing a qualified South Carolina Teacher Cadet course at their respective high school and meeting the criteria established by CERRA (Center for Educator Requirement, Retention, and Advancement) with a grade of “B” or better may receive three-hours elective credit in Education. This course satisfies the requirements for EDUC 1201 Cornerstone to Education . Prerequisite: Acceptance into Lock 1, GPA 2.75.
  
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    EDUC 1201 Cornerstone to Education

    1 credit
    This course presents the teacher candidate with an overview of the education major and the teaching profession. Topics discussed include characteristics of the current teaching profession, the role of the teacher within the school, requirements for admission into the SWU Teacher Education Program, the Praxis test requirements, developing an e-portfolio, and the process of teacher certification in South Carolina. Candidates will also become familiar with the SWU Teacher Education Handbook. This course is a prerequisite for all other education courses. Required of all teacher candidates unless they have had EDUC 1153 .
  
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    EDUC 2003 Effective Methods for the Elementary and Middle School/Field Experience

    3 credits
    The purposes, parent-school-community relationships, curriculum, and activities of the elementary school. The first half of the course includes methods taken from the effective teaching research. Included in this course will be 30hours of field-placement experience. Required of all elementary education and special education teacher candidates. May be taken by Music Education, Physical Education and Special Education majors.
  
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    EDUC 2113 Foundations of Education

    3 credits
    Sociological and philosophical foundations of Western education. Included will be a study of the crucial issues found in our present schools. Required of all teacher candidates.
  
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    EDUC 2123 Effective Methods for Middle and Secondary School/Field Experience

    3 credits
    The purposes, parent-school-community relationships, curriculum, and activities of the secondary school. Studies in educational tests and measurement are also included. Included in this course will be 30 hours of field-placement experience. Required of all secondary candidates. May be taken by Music Education, Physical Education and Special Education majors. (Fall)
  
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    EDUC 2663 Effective Methods for Early Childhood Education/Field Experience

    3 credits
    The purposes, parent-school-community relationships, curriculum, and activities of the early childhood. Included in this course will be 30 hours of field-placement experience. Required of all early childhood education teacher candidates. (Fall)
  
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    EDUC 3033 Methods of Teaching EC Math

    3 credits
    Methods and materials for teaching mathematics from pre-kindergarten through grade three. Required of all early childhood teacher candidates. (Spring) Prerequisite: Math competency (MATH 1053 ); Acceptance into Lock 1, GPA 2.75.
  
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    EDUC 3053 Methods of Teaching Elementary School Math

    3 credits
    This specific methods course will provide an opportunity for students to learn methods of teaching mathematics in grades 2-6 as they study the Common Core State Standards in Mathematics and the SC State Standards for mathematics. Students will write lesson plans as part of thematic units that teach mathematics effectively to all students, including students with exceptional learning needs (ELN), across the curriculum. Students will create hands-on materials for use in the classroom. Emphasis will be placed on using evidence-based practices to improve outcomes for all students. Required of all elementary education teacher candidates. (Spring) Prerequisite: Math competency (MATH 1053 ); Acceptance into Lock 1, GPA 2.75.
  
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    EDUC 3183 Ethics in Education

    3 credits
    A study of representative ethical theories as they relate to various contemporary problems in education. Special consideration will be given to the application of Christian-ethical principles to values clarification and decision-making in schools. Required of all teacher candidates or acceptable substitute. (Fall)
  
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    EDUC 3203 Introduction to the Exceptional Child

    3 credits
    The history of educating exceptional children. An examination of the special problems confronted in dealing with the gifted, learning disabled, intellectually disabled, emotionally disturbed, or physically handicapped child. Included in this course will be 30 hours of service learning. Required of all teacher candidates except physical education. Prerequisite: Acceptance into Lock 1, GPA 2.75.
  
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    EDUC 3213 R2S Foundations in Reading Middle and Secondary

    3 credits
    This Read to Succeed course will outline the perspectives of leading reading researchers, combined with those of practitioners of various fields, to provide a comprehensive look at what constitutes reading in today’s middle and secondary classroom. The course will provide future middle and secondary teachers with strong, research-based teaching practices, the development of characteristics of students as readers and writers, and the instructional practices that best serve them. Prerequisite: Acceptance into Lock 1, GPA 2.75.
  
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    EDUC 3233 Methods of Teaching the Learning Disabled

    3 credits
    Principles, methods, and materials for teaching the learning-disabled student. Required of all special education teacher candidates. (Fall, Even Years) Prerequisite: Acceptance into Lock 1, GPA 2.5.
  
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    EDUC 3243 Characteristics of Mild to Moderate Intellectual Disabilities

    3 credits
    The causes and treatment of the intellectually disabled individual with attention given to the special psychological problems of this group. The social issues involved in the prevention and treatment of intellectual disabilities will be presented. Required of all special education teacher candidates. (Spring, Odd Years) Prerequisite: Acceptance into Lock 1, GPA 2.5.
  
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    EDUC 3253 Methods of Teaching Mild to Moderate Intellectually Disabled in the Content Areas With Field Experience

    3 credits
    Materials, methods, curriculum development, and writing specific objectives for students with mild intellectual disabilities. Also practical instructional strategies in self-help skills. A 36-hour field experience is also a required component of this course. Required of all special education teacher candidates. Elective for regular education teacher candidates. (Fall, Odd Years) Prerequisite: Acceptance into Lock 1, GPA 2.75.
  
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    EDUC 3273 R2S Methods of Teaching Reading and Writing Middle and Secondary School with Practicum

    3 credits
    This Read to Succeed course will explore methods of improving knowledge and skills in the middle and secondary content areas by implementing strategies, instructional approaches, materials and a balanced curriculum to develop language literacy skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) in the middle or secondary school setting. A variety of assessment tools and practices to plan and evaluate effective reading and writing skills for the diverse 6-12 students will be examined in a literate environment that fosters reading and writing. Included in this course will be 36 hours of field-placement experience. Required of all secondary and P-12 teacher candidates. (Fall) Prerequisite: Acceptance into Lock 1, GPA 2.5.
  
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    EDUC 3292 Classroom and Behavior Management

    2 credits
    Classroom-management techniques with particular emphasis on creating a democratic classroom in consideration of current law. Management-application models are discussed in the context of classroom environments. (Fall, Spring) Prerequisite: Acceptance into Lock 1, GPA 2.75. Corequisite: Enrollment in EDUC 450, Pre-Clinical Field Experience with placement in a cooperating school as arranged by the Director of Field Placements.
  
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    EDUC 3363 Behavior of the Preschool Child/Field Experience

    3 credits
    The preschool child, including systematic observation and participation. Included in this course will be 36 hours of field-placement experience. Required of all early-childhood education teacher candidates. (Spring) Prerequisites: PSYC 2003  or PSYC 3103 ; Acceptance into Lock 1, GPA 2.75.
  
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    EDUC 3383 Curriculum for the Middle School/Field Experience

    3 credits
    Curriculum for the Middle School with Field Experience explores current resources, relevant guidelines, and best practices for the curriculum for the middle grades. Topics include the middle-school curriculum, challenges of teaching adolescents, professional responsibilities, skills for a meaningful curriculum, preparing an Instructional Unit, assessing students in the middle grades, and best practices and strategies. Prerequisite: Acceptance into Lock 1, GPA 2.75.
  
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    EDUC 3423 Instructional Technology for Education Majors

    3 credits
    Instructional technology techniques that will enhance the instructional experience for both the instructor and the learner. Topics include designing and planning technology-enhanced instruction, the digital technologies, administrative and academic software, audiovisual technologies, and ethical issues involved in using technology. Prerequisite: Acceptance into Lock 1, GPA 2.75. May meet general education computer-science requirement.
  
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    EDUC 3523 Curriculum, Instruction, Assessment in General & Special Education

    3 credits
    A survey of assessment practices that facilitate student learning. Topics include the policies of the federal government that have influenced the funding of state education, the role of the learner in assessment practices, types of assessments, the planning and construction of valid and reliable assessments, standardized tests, and basic statistical applications. (Spring) Prerequisite: Acceptance into Lock 1, GPA 2.75.
  
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    EDUC 3703 Methods of Teaching Elementary School Language Arts

    3 credits
    Methods course in teaching language arts, which consists of oral language, listening, writing, reading and viewing. The teacher candidate will demonstrate knowledge of the process skills and standards involved in teaching these modes of language in the elementary school. Note: Required of all elementary education teacher candidates. Prerequisite: Acceptance into Lock 1. (Fall)
  
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    EDUC 3742 Methods of Teaching Creative Arts in General and Special Education

    2 credits
    This course integrates the areas of visual arts, music, and drama, with other content in the elementary curricular sequences to help early childhood, elementary, and special education teachers create a balanced approach to learning in the classroom. The vocabulary and skills needed to enrich each of the areas of the creative arts will be considered along with the artistic development of children. Planning for the creative arts through theme-based units and hands-on activities will broaden overall awareness for the arts. Required of all early childhood, elementary, and special education teacher candidates. (Fall) Prerequisite: Acceptance into Lock 1, GPA 2.75.
  
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    EDUC 3763 Methods of Teaching Elementary School Science

    3 credits
    This course is designed to provide an overview of methods, materials, and current research relating to the teaching of science in the elementary-school classroom rather than teaching the skills and knowledge bases for science. The purpose is to enable the teacher candidate to effectively teach science concepts in the elementary school. Emphasis will be placed on student-centered approaches to science including discovery, inquiry, and experimentation. Current theories and standards for using science-process skills and various technologies in the elementary classroom are explored. Required of all elementary education teacher candidates. (Fall) Prerequisite: Acceptance into Lock 1, GPA 2.75.
  
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    EDUC 3772 Methods of Teaching Early Childhood Science

    2 credits
    This course is designed to provide an overview of methods, materials, and current research relating to the teaching of science in the early childhood classroom rather than teaching the skills and knowledge bases for science. The purpose is to enable the teacher candidate to effectively teach science concepts in the grades K-3. Emphasis will be placed on student-centered approaches to science including discovery, inquiry, and experimentation. Current theories and standards for using science-process skills and various technologies in early childhood classrooms are explored. Cooperative groups will research and develop thematic units based on S.C. Standards for Science. Materials for the thematic unit will address pupil needs across the curriculum. Required of all early childhood education teacher candidates. (Spring) Prerequisite: Acceptance into Lock 1, GPA 2.75.
  
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    EDUC 3783 Methods of Teaching Elementary School Social Studies

    3 credits
    This course is designed to provide an overview of methods, materials, and current research related to the teaching of social studies in the elementary-school classroom rather than to teach the skills and knowledge bases of social studies. The purpose is to enable the teacher candidate to effectively teach social-studies concepts in the elementary school. Emphasis will be placed on student-centered approaches to social studies, including inquiry-based methods. Current theories and standards for using social-studies process skills and various technologies in the elementary classroom are explored. Required of all elementary education teacher candidates. (Spring) Prerequisites: HIST 106, HIST 205; Acceptance into Lock 1, GPA 2.75.
  
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    EDUC 4013 Methods of Teaching Early Childhood Social Studies

    3 credits
    Designed to provide an overview of methods, materials, and current research relating to the teaching of social studies rather than to teach social-studies knowledge. The purpose is to enable the teacher candidate to effectively teach social-studies concepts to young children (grades K-3) through integrated units, experiences, and inquiry-based activities appropriate for the young child. Required of all early childhood education teacher candidates. (Fall) Prerequisites: HIST 106, HIST 205; Acceptance into Lock 1, GPA 2.75.
  
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    EDUC 4153 Methods of Teaching English in the Secondary/Middle School

    3 credits
    The principles and methods of teaching high/middle school English. Appropriate materials to be used will also be included. Required of all secondary English education teacher candidates. Offered at departmental discretion. Prerequisite: Acceptance into Lock 1, GPA 2.75.
  
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    EDUC 4163 Methods of Teaching Social Studies in the Secondary/Middle School

    3 credits
    This course is an introduction to the philosophy and practice of teaching social studies at the secondary and/or middle school level. Topics include short- and long-term planning, effective instructional strategies, and multi-faceted assessment. Prerequisite: Acceptance into Lock 1, GPA 2.75.
  
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    EDUC 4203 Methods of Teaching Science in the Secondary/Middle School

    3 credits
    This course is an introduction to the philosophy and practice of teaching science at the secondary and/or middle school level. Topics include short- and long-term planning, effective instructional strategies, and multi-faceted assessment. Required of all secondary biology education teacher candidates. Offered at departmental discretion. Prerequisite: Acceptance into Lock 1, GPA 2.75.
  
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    EDUC 4223 Methods of Teaching Mathematics in the Secondary/Middle School

    3 credits
    Methods, techniques, and procedures of presentation of mathematics in the classroom. Special attention to the laboratory approach, games, the discovery-inquiry approach, number theory and systems, and individualized approach. Required of all secondary math education teacher candidates. Offered at departmental discretion. Prerequisite: Acceptance into Lock 1, GPA 2.75.
  
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    EDUC 4233 Characteristics of Learning Disabilities

    3 credits
    The etiology, characteristics, curriculum adaptations, and techniques of intervention with learning-disabled children. Required of all special education teacher candidates. (Fall Odd Years) Prerequisite: Acceptance into Lock 1, GPA 2.75.
  
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    EDUC 4243 Characteristics of Emotional/Behavioral Disorders

    3 credits
    Identifying, understanding, and planning for students with emotional/ behavioral disorders (E/BD) in special education and general classroom settings. Includes the study of the field, theoretical models, current trends and issues, identifying characteristics, and possible causes of E/BD. Incorporation of assessment data, observational findings, and other sources of information to aid in the appropriate educational planning for children and youth are also discussed. Required of all special education teacher candidates. (Spring, Even Years) Prerequisite: Acceptance into Lock 1, GPA 2.75.
  
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    EDUC 4253 Methods of Teaching the Emotional/Behavioral Disordered

    3 credits
    Intervention strategies, behavior management techniques, curriculum modifications, and writing accurate educational plans. Attention also to legal requirements and implications for the classroom. Projects provide an opportunity to apply the skills learned during the course. Required of all special education teacher candidates. (Fall, Even Years) Prerequisite: Acceptance into Lock 1, GPA 2.75.
  
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    EDUC 4502 Pre-Clinical Experience

    2 credits
    The last school practicum experience prior to the clinical experience. Candidates are assigned to two pre-clinical experiences at two different levels. One-half of the candidate’s time is spent in each academic setting. The candidates prepare lesson plans and teach mini-lessons. All candidates must receive favorable evaluations by the supervising teachers, as well as credit for the course, to proceed to Clinical Experience I. The teacher candidate must provide evidence that Praxis II: Subject Assessment Tests and Praxis II: Principles of Learning and Teaching (PLT) Test have either been attempted or passed during this course. Required of all education candidates in all programs the semester before Clinical Experience. Prerequisites: Full admission to Teacher Education, competency in computer, math, oral communication, reading, and writing skills. Acceptance into Lock 1, GPA 2.75. Corequisite: EDUC 4502.
  
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    EDUC 4513 Practicum in Learning Disabilities

    3 credits
    This practicum is intended only for those students wishing to add Learning Disabilities to their teaching certification. Not required of students with a Special Education major in the On-Campus program. The practicum student will be placed in a Learning Disabilities special education classroom for a minimum of 100 hours of field experience. Students will observe, tutor individual students, teach students in small and/or large group settings, and assist the teacher in appropriate learning experiences. This course requires observation, participation and actual teaching. Students are responsible for their own transportation. Prerequisite: Lock I admission with 2.75 GPA or teacher certification.
  
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    EDUC 4523 Practicum in Intellectual Disabilities

    3 credits
    This practicum is intended only for those students wishing to add Mental Retardation to their teaching certification. Not required of students with a Special Education major in the On-Campus program. The practicum student will be placed in a classroom for the mentally retarded for a minimum of 100 hours of field experience. Students will observe, tutor individual students, teach students in small and/or large group settings, and assist the teacher in appropriate learning experiences. This course requires observation, participation and actual teaching. Students are responsible for their own transportation. Prerequisite: Lock I admission with 2.75 GPA or teacher certification.
  
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    EDUC 4627 Clinical Experience I

    7 credits
    An integrated course in observation, participation, conferencing, and actual teaching; class management and modern methods of teaching; and planning, instruction, supervised study, uses of standard tests, and individual instruction. Candidates are generally assigned to one of their pre-clinical experience supervising teachers. Students are responsible for their own transportation. Required of all education candidates in all programs. Prerequisite: Acceptance into Lock 1, GPA 2.75. EDUC 4502 , completion of all coursework and Lock II Assessment criteria. The teacher candidate must provide evidence that the Praxis II content area tests have been passed before admission to Lock II. (Before state licensure can be obtained the teacher candidate must pass both the Principles of Learning and Teaching and the Praxis II: Subject Assessments exams). Co-requisite: EDUC 4637 .
  
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    EDUC 4637 Clinical Experience II

    7 credits
    A continuation of EDUC 4628. Students are responsible for their own transportation. Required of all education candidates in all programs. Prerequisite: Acceptance into Lock 1, GPA 2.75. EDUC 4502 , completion of all coursework and Lock II Assessment criteria. The teacher candidate must provide evidence that the Praxis II content area tests have been passed before admission to Lock II. (Before state licensure can be obtained the teacher candidate must pass both the Principles of Learning and Teaching and the Praxis II: Subject Assessments exams). Co-requisite: EDUC 4627 .
  
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    EDUC 4903 Independent Study

    Variable credit
    Prerequisite: Acceptance into Lock 1, GPA 2.75.
  
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    EDUC 4993 Research in Education

    3 credits
    Prerequisite: Acceptance into Lock 1, GPA 2.75.

English

  
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    ENGL 100L Freshman Composition I Lab

    1 credit
    This lab provides supplemental instruction and educational resources for students who are concurrently enrolled in ENGL 1003.  The lab provides assistance with ENGL 1003 assignments as well as the essential skills needed to be successful in ENGL 1003. 


    Note: Students who are admitted conditionally and/or those who score below the required minimum TOEFL score for admission to SWU must enroll in ENGL 100L concurrently with their enrollment in ENGL 1003.  Students who have not earned a passing grade in ENGL 1003 must enroll in ENGL 100L the next semester along with ENGL 1003.  Students required to take ENGL 100L must earn a passing grade in ENGL 1003 and ENGL 100L in order to receive credit for ENGL 1003.

  
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    ENGL 1003 Freshman Composition I

    3 credits
    Emphasis on composition requiring a command of the language with respect to grammar and usage, unified paragraphs, and well-organized, persuasive essays. Effective reading and research reporting are also stressed. Some attention is given to skills needed for effective oral and written communication. Satisfactory performance on writing portfolio required to receive credit for course. Offered every semester. All students must enroll in ENGL 1003 and must earn a minimum grade of C-.  Withdrawal is not permitted from this course until after the last day to drop a course without record, but the withdrawal must be completed before the last day to drop a course.  Students must first consult both their advisor and the instructor before withdrawing from this course.
  
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    ENGL 1013 Freshman Composition II

    3 credits
    Emphasis on refining and sharpening composition skills acquired in ENGL 1003 . Introduction to literary analysis of short story, drama, film, and poetry. Oral presentations and research paper required. Offered every semester. Prerequisites: ENGL 1003 . All students must earn a minimum grade of C- in ENGL 1013. 
  
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    ENGL 1151 Cornerstone English Seminar

    1 credit
    This seminar will introduce students to the English major, discussing the kinds of courses that are taught, the kinds of skill that are needed, and the kinds of outcomes students can expect. It will also introduce students to the research skills required of English majors. Students will spend time doing research in the library, writing bibliographic entries, writing précis and abstracts of articles, and finally developing a bibliography for a particular topic. Ideally, it will be taken in the second semester of the freshman year, but no later than the first semester of the sophomore year. Transfers into the major or transfers from other institutions should take it as soon as possible after they enter the major (assuming they are sophomores).
  
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    ENGL 2053 World Literature

    3 credits
    Marshall McLuhan referred to the world as a “global village,” noting that advances in media and travel have made all corners of the world accessible to many of us. ENGL 2053 is designed to make students aware of world literature beginning with the Enlightenment in Europe and the Americas through Contemporary World Literature. Students will study representative works of folklore, mythology, classics, and Western and non-Western literature. Individual research projects and oral presentations should provide additional insight.
  
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    ENGL 2103 Speech Communication

    3 credits
    The fundamentals of speech, with emphasis on components of communication, critical thinking, and formal and informal presentations. Offered most semesters.
  
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    ENGL 2113 Oral Interpretation

    3 credits
    An introduction to the principles of acting, pantomime, and oral interpretation of poetry and prose. Offered on demand. Prerequisite: ENGL 1013  and writing competency.
  
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    ENGL 2123 Interpersonal Communication

    3 credits
    Designed to assist students in becoming ethically responsible interpersonal communicators who understand theoretical choices and who can design, express, interpret, and evaluate functional messages. Prerequisites: ENGL 1013  and writing competency.
  
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    ENGL 2203 Modern Christian Writers

    3 credits
    A critical study of nonfiction and/or fiction by selected major Christian writers. May include authors such as C. S. Lewis, J. R. R. Tolkien, G. K. Chesterton, Graham Greene, Alexander Solzhenitsyn, Walker Percy, Frederick Buechner, etc. Prerequisites: ENGL 1003 .
  
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    ENGL 2503 Poetry and Its Process

    3 credits
    Students will be introduced to the rhetorical strategies and composition approaches of poets; about two-thirds of the class will focus on students’ reading poetry for its strategies and approaches, and about one-third on students’ investigating the strategies and approaches of poetry through engaging in the students’ own poetic process. Students will look at English-language poets, especially relatively contemporary poets. Prerequisite: EDUC 1013 .
  
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    ENGL 2603 Fiction and Its Process

    3 credits
    Students will be introduced to the rhetorical strategies and composition approaches of writers of short fiction; about two-thirds of the class will focus on students’ reading short fiction for its strategies and approaches, and about one-third on students’ investigating the strategies and approaches of short fiction through engaging in the students’ own writing process. Students will look at English-language writers, especially relatively contemporary writers. Prerequisite: ENGL 1013 .
  
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    ENGL 2703 Non-Fiction Prose and Its Process

    3 credits
    Students will be introduced to the rhetorical strategies and composition approaches of writers of shorter non-fiction prose; about two-thirds of the class will focus on students’ reading shorter non-fiction for its strategies and approaches, and about one-third on students’ investigating the strategies and approaches of shorter non-fiction through engaging in the students’ own writing process. Students will look at English-language writers, especially relatively contemporary writers Prerequisite: ENGL 1013 .
  
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    ENGL 3003 Adolescent Literature

    3 credits
    The opportunity for the interpretive and critical study of literature suitable for the middle school and high school student. Wide reading is required, including selections by minority and non-Western writers. Offered fall of odd years. Prerequisite: ENGL 2053  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 3013 American Literature to 1900

    3 credits
    A survey of American literature from the Colonial period to the present. Includes literature by women and minorities. Offered spring of even years. Prerequisite: ENGL 2053  or permission of the instructor.
  
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    ENGL 3023 Language Structure and Skills

    3 credits
    Examines the principle elements of English language structure, including but not limited to a thorough review of the fundamental elements of the sentence-parts of speech and patterns-and the foundational structure of the paragraph as a building block of coherence. Once a foundation is laid, subsequent lessons explore more complex structures and relationships with a view toward developing a personal writing style.  Prerequisite:  ENGL 1003  Freshman Composition I
  
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    ENGL 3033 Composition and Rhetoric

    3 credits
    Examines the principles and practices of composing and teaching composition. Includes an historical study of English language with attention to phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and practical aspects of language grammars. Serves as a practicum in composing and assessing processes, collaborative learning, writers’ purposes, audience expectations, and language conventions.
  
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    ENGL 3043 Children’s Literature

    3 credits
    A survey intended to provide prospective teachers with the opportunity for interpretative and critical study of literature suitable for children. The characteristics of subject matter, literary style, and the ways of illustrating are discussed. Wide reading is required. Required of all early childhood and elementary education teacher candidates. (Fall)
  
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    ENGL 3053 British Literature I

    3 credits
    A chronological survey of English literature emphasizing critical analysis of representative works of major authors with attention given to backgrounds and characteristics of respective literary periods. 3053 includes Anglo-Saxon times to the Romantic period; offered fall of even years. Offered spring of odd years. Prerequisite: ENGL 2053  or permission of the instructor.
  
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    ENGL 3063 British Literature II

    3 credits
    A chronological survey of English literature emphasizing critical analysis of representative works of major authors with attention given to backgrounds and characteristics of respective literary periods. Offered fall of even years. 3063 includes the Romantic period into the Twentieth Century; offered spring of odd years. Prerequisite: ENGL 2053  or permission of the instructor.
  
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    ENGL 3083 British and American Literature, Modern and Postmodern

    3 credits
    Students will engage in a survey of British and American literature surrounding the two major wars of the twentieth century, with a focus on the advent of Modernism and Post-Modernism and the relationship of such movements of the historical forces of the twentieth century. Prerequisite: ENGL 2053  or permission of the instructor.
  
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    ENGL 3093 Contemporary Literature in English

    3 credits
    Students will engage in a survey of contemporary literature in English, including literature from countries other than England and the U.S., discussing the Post-Colonial literature from Britain’s former colonies as well as the impact of literature on contemporary events and vice-versa. Prerequisite: ENGL 2053  or permission of the instructor.
  
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    ENGL 3103 Introduction to Principles/Strategies of Teaching English as a Second Language

    3 credits
    Introduction to the content and methodology required for teaching English to speakers of other languages. Course issues include identification and analysis of linguistic elements of other languages as they contrast with English, vocabulary, syntax, and culture. Practical methods and materials appropriate to varying levels of students will be developed. Prerequisites: ENGL 2053  and writing competency.
  
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    ENGL 3153 Advanced Composition

    3 credits
    An advanced study of prose types. Attention is given to modern rhetorical theory and to the creative process involved in writing, revising, and editing. Offered spring of even years. Prerequisites: ENGL 1013  and writing competency.
  
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    ENGL 3173 Professional Writing

    3 credits
    Professional Writing aims to prepare students to be effective writers in their professional careers. It helps students to develop workplace writing skills which will help them to understand to apply the rhetorical principles guiding and underlying workplace writing practices. This course will introduce students to the basic issues and elements of technical writing, including but not limited to defining and analyzing workplace-writing problems, writing various technical documents (such as memos, proposals, letters, reports), and developing basic electronic writing skills. Prerequisites: ENGL 1003  and ENGL 1013 .
  
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    ENGL 3183 Creative Writing

    3 credits
    Supervised writing with each student undertaking projects according to interest. Attention is given to the composing process and to skills involved in revising and editing. Offered spring of odd years. Prerequisites: ENGL 1013  and writing competency.
  
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    ENGL 3193 Writing for the Media

    3 credits
    Emphasis on developing the skills of professional writers in all major areas of media, including the World Wide Web, broadcast, newspapers, magazines, advertising, and public relations. Covers AP style for print and broadcast.
  
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    ENGL 3203 The English Novel

    3 credits
    The English novel from the eighteenth century into the present. Offered on demand. Prerequisite: ENGL 2053  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 3243 Reading/Writing for LEP Students

    3 credits
    This course surveys research on the mental processes and linguistic contexts involved in reading and in writing in a second language. Pedagogical implications for elementary, secondary and postsecondary learners are discussed.
  
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    ENGL 3263 Teach/Assessment English Language Learners

    3 credits
    This course will look at trends in Second Language Assessment and Testing at all levels of the educational system. We will explore both authentic assessment and standardized testing that is used with second language learners. The emphasis will be strategies for authentic assessment used in the classroom on a day-to-day basis.
  
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    ENGL 3303 American Novel

    3 credits
    A selection of major American novels. Research paper is required. Offered on demand. Prerequisite: ENGL 3013  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 3353 The Contemporary Novel in English

    3 credits
    Students will study novels written in English in the twentieth century, including novels written outside the U. S. and the U. K., including novels ranging from the literary to the popular. Prerequisite: ENGL 2053  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 4003 Studies in English

    Variable credit
    Study of any topic in English meeting the approval of the division chair and the academic dean. Offered on sufficient demand.
  
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    ENGL 4153 Capstone English Seminar

    3 credits
    This seminar will introduce students to a variety of careers that English majors, both immediately following college and with additional training in a variety of graduate school programs. Students will be encouraged to examine career options, possibly with the help of interest inventories, look for internships, and plan courses with an eye to a future career. It will also discuss graduate school studies, the GRE, and graduate school applications. In addition, a requirement of the course will be the development of a research project of senior-level significance. It will ideally be taken in the first semester of the senior year, and must be taken before graduation. The major post-test, will be taken in this seminar. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing or permission of the Division Chair.
  
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    ENGL 4203 Modern Grammar and Linguistics

    3 credits
    Linguistic analysis, including principles of phonology, morphology, and syntax as related to traditional, structural, and transformational grammars. Other topics include the various purposes and varieties of language, as well as the processes associated with language acquisition and use. Offered fall of even years. Prerequisite: ENGL 1013 .
  
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    ENGL 4303 Development of Modern English

    3 credits
    The development of the English language from its beginning to the present. Offered spring of odd years. Prerequisite: ENGL 1013 .
  
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    ENGL 4503 Shakespeare

    3 credits
    The main comedies, histories, and tragedies. Offered spring of even years.
  
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    ENGL 4553 Senior Issues, Practices, and Ethics in Communication

    3 credits
    Examination of current issues and practices in the field of communication, with emphasis on ethics. Major research/writing or presentation project required.
  
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    ENGL 4703 Literary Criticism

    3 credits
    Major approaches to literary criticism, in theory and practice, from Aristotle to the present. Offered fall of odd years. Prerequisite: 15 hours in ENGL or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 4803 Senior Practicum

    Variable credit
    Open to seniors who show promise of professional development. Supervised training in a business or in a community service agency appropriate to the student’s interests. Approval of students and of placement will be given by the coordinator of studies in English. Credit: up to seventeen semester hours. Prerequisite: competency in computer, math, oral communication, reading, and writing. P/NC
  
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    ENGL 4814 TESOL Practicum

    Variable credit
    Open to seniors pursuing a minor in TESOL. Supervised training in a school or community agency. Approval of students and of placement will be coordinated by the director of the TESOL program. Prerequisites: competency in computer, math, oral communication, reading, and writing. P/NC
  
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    ENGL 4903 Independent Study

    Variable credit
    This course provides opportunities for students to study topics which interest them but which are not available as courses in the program. Prerequisite: Senior standing and permission of the coordinator of English studies or the director of the TESOL program.
  
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    ENGL 4990 Research in English

    3 credits
    English majors in the Honors Program, or English majors who wish to complete an honors project, will use this course for completing their project. Prerequisite: membership in the Honors Program or approval of the English coordinator.

Exercise Science

  
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    EXSC 434L Exercise Assessment/Test Lab

    0 credit
    Corequisite: EXSC 4344
  
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    EXSC 1003 Introduction to Exercise Science

    3 credits
    Study of the philosophical, historical, and contemporary issues of exercise science and health. Based on the concept of accepting self-responsibility, this course also gives students practical information regarding the development of strategies to make informed health decisions that will positively affect their well-being throughout their lives. This course will also begin the discussion of science and faith.
  
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    EXSC 1063 Science of Personal Training

    3 credits
    This course provides a broad introduction to the science and practice of personal training including the core components of exercise assessment and training, behavior modification, injury prevention, sound business practices and basic legal issues.
  
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    EXSC 2001 Practicum

    1 credit
    Developing a basic wellness program and spending forty (40) hours of practical experience as a personal trainer working with a university employee under the direction of the coordinator of studies for the Department of Exercise Science.
  
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    EXSC 2503 Emergency Medical Response

    3 hours
    The intent of this course is to provide an individual with the knowledge and skills necessary to work as an Emergency Medical Responder, to help sustain life,reduce pain, and minimize the consequences of injury or sudden illness until more advanced medical help takes over.
 

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