Mar 30, 2020  
2018-2019 Undergraduate Bulletin 
    
2018-2019 Undergraduate Bulletin [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


All courses are offered yearly, upon sufficient demand, unless indicated otherwise. Those courses offered on an alternate-year basis have the next academic year of availability indicated by a date within parentheses immediately following the course description.

Courses may be offered in a variety of formats, including online.

Although the course generally will be offered on a regular basis, the university reserves the right to introduce or delete courses, depending on sufficient demand.

Those courses graded on a Pass/No Credit basis only are indicated by P/NC.

Institutional credit only (S/NC) does not give graduation credit but does count toward full loads.

The fourth digit in the course number indicates the number of semester credit hours.

 

Physical Education

  
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    PHED 3012 Principles, Ethics and Issues of Athletic Coaching

    2 credits
    Principles, strategies and methods used in teaching and coaching various sports. The nature of the coaching profession with particular attention to professional expectations and responsibilities, ethical considerations, applied principles of athletic coaching, problems and issues of interscholastic and intercollegiate athletics, as well as legal issues regarding the coaching profession. Prerequisite: Acceptance into Lock 1, GPA 2.75.
  
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    PHED 3023 Prevention and Treatment of Athletic Injuries

    3 credits
    Science of prevention, evaluation, treatment, and rehabilitation of athletic injuries. Emphasis is placed on developing an understanding of the mechanisms of injury and on acquiring practical training room skills, including protective wrapping and taping techniques. CPR/First Aid Certificate required for course completion. May include a field component.
  
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    PHED 3033 Physical Education, Health, and Recreation for the Adapted School Program

    3 credits
    A foundational course designed to help Physical Education instructors to adapt lesson plan preparation, teaching strategies, and actual instruction of students who are identified with physical, mental, social and emotion difficulties in order to be able to work with special needs population. Prerequisite: Acceptance into Lock 1, GPA 2.75.
  
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    PHED 3133 Methods of Teaching Minor Sports

    3 credits
    Minor Sports I deals with the correct methods of teaching the various skill involved in teaching individual sports that include archery, bowling, tennis, golf, ultimate Frisbee, etc. Rules, regulations, terminology, and pedagogical strategies will also be discussed as they relate to the concepts employed in the performance of these sports. The skills will be applied in written and oral lesson plan preparations. Students will work with sports for all ages.
  
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    PHED 3153 Methods of Teaching Physical Activities, Health, & Exercise for Middle & Secondary Schools

    3 credits
    The goals and objectives of physical education and health programs in middle and secondary schools are covered in this course. Student participation in the recreational activities for each grade level is required as well as the involvement in the health and safety practices necessary for the operation of a successful health and physical education program. The skills will be applied in written and oral lesson plan preparations.
  
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    PHED 3163 Methods of Teaching Health and Physical Education in Middle and Secondary Schools

    3 credits
    The purpose of this course is for physical education students to develop the knowledge and skills to plan, implement, and evaluate appropriate and effective physical education progressions. The course will consist of lectures, class participation in discussions, demonstrations of teaching movement, and teaching practice.
  
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    PHED 3173 Exercise for the Aging Population

    3 credits
    As the older adult population increases, so does the demand for fitness professionals who understand the capabilities and special needs of seniors with illnesses, disabilities, chronic disorders, and sedentary lifestyles. This course addresses specific precautions for resistance training and exercises for aging adults with specific needs or conditions.
  
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    PHED 3203 Methods of Teaching Major Sports II

    3 credits
    Major Sports II deals with the correct methods of teaching the various skill involved in teaching team sports that include football, baseball, track and filed. Rules, regulations, terminology, and pedagogical strategies will also be discussed as they relate to the concepts employed in the performance of these sports. The skills will be applied in written and oral lesson plan preparations.
  
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    PHED 3283 Methods of Teaching Major Sports I

    3 credits
    Major Sports I deals with the correct methods of teaching the various skill involved in teaching team sports that include soccer, volleyball, and basketball. Rules, regulations, terminology, and pedagogical strategies will also be discussed as they relate to the concepts employed in the performance of these sports. The skills will be applied in written and oral lesson plan preparations. Students will work with sports for all ages.
  
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    PHED 4001 Athletic Coaching Internship

    1 credit
    All students pursuing the Minor in Physical Education/Athletic Coaching shall be required to complete a coaching internship with an approved athletic team. The team may be an interscholastic, intercollegiate, or Junior Olympic program, which will be approved by a faculty member from the School of Education/Coordinator of the Athletic Coaching Minor.
  
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    PHED 4003 Studies in Physical Education

    Variable credit
    Any topic in physical education meeting the approval of the Division Chair and the Academic Dean. Offered on sufficient demand.
  
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    PHED 4019 Physical Education Internship

    Variable (6-9 credits)
    Directed professional field experience in Physical Education in the area of concentration for nine (9) credits (360 hours). Designed to give the physical education major practical experience in the areas of Coaching or Fitness for the Aging. Prerequisites: Senior standing; students must apply one semester prior to the semester in which they wish to intern; approval by the department; a signed contract; and a current CPR certification for the duration of the experience. Students must have a current TB test and a background check.
  
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    PHED 4033 Tests and Measurements in Physical Education

    3 credits
    The study of tests associated with a sound program in the area of health and physical education. Emphasis on the statistical procedures and the administration of tests in general-motor abilities, physical fitness, skills, and knowledge. Prerequisite: Acceptance into Lock 1, GPA 2.75.
  
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    PHED 4063 Physical Education and Health for the Elementary School

    3 credits
    The aims, objectives, and evaluation of physical education and health programs in the elementary school. Student participation in games and recreational activities for each grade level is required, as well as involvement in the health and safety practices necessary for the operations of an efficient health and physical-education program.
  
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    PHED 4903 Independent Study

    Variable credit
  
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    PHED 4993 Honors Research in Physical Education

    3 credits

Physical Science

  
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    PHSC 1544 Introduction to Physical Sciences

    4 credits
    A general study of chemistry, physics, astronomy and earth science. Laboratory included.
  
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    PHSC 2903 Physical Science Studies

    Variable credit
    Study of any topic in physical science meeting the approval of the chair of the division and the dean of the college. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor and competency in mathematics.

Physics

  
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    PHYS 2044 Physics I

    4 credits
    An algebra-based physics course covering mechanics, thermodynamics, and waves including sound (first semester), and electricity and magnetism, optics, and “modern” physics (second semester). Prerequisite: 500 or better on SAT (comparable on ACT) or completion of Algebra and Trig course or higher level college course. Lab included.
  
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    PHYS 2054 Physics II

    4 credits
    An algebra-based physics course covering mechanics, thermodynamics, and waves including sound (first semester), and electricity and magnetism, optics, and “modern” physics (second semester). Prerequisite: 500 or better on SAT (comparable on ACT) or completion of Algebra and Trig course or higher level college course. Lab included.

Psychology

  
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    PSYC 200L General Psychology Lab

    1 credit
    The general psychology lab is designed as a supplement to the instruction offered in PSYC 2003  . This course provides students with hands on learning opportunities to reinforce the concepts presented in lecture. Students will be introduced to basic lab protocols and research techniques. In addition, the course will serve as an introduction to the psychology major with emphasis on career planning. Prerequsite:  Previous completion or concurrent enrollment in PSYC 2003. Note:  Lab is reserved for psychology majors.
  
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    PSYC 312L Laboratory in Human Growth and Development

    1 credit
    An experiential course exploring the application of lifespan developmental principles to human experience and behavior.  This lab supplements PSYC 3123  Human Growth and Development. Note:  Required for all psychology majors.  Offered in spring semesters in traditional format.
  
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    PSYC 314L Laboratory in Human-Information Processing

    1 credit
    An experiential course exploring the application of principles and theories within the cognitive sciences to understand and enhance human experience/behavior.  This lab supplements PSYC 3143  Human Information Processing. Note:  Required for all psychology majors.  Offered in spring semesters in traditional format.
  
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    PSYC 340L Laboratory in Social Psychology

    1 credit
    An experiential course exploring the application of social psychological principles to human behavior and experience.  This lab supplements PSYC 3403  Social Psychology. Note:  Required for all psychology majors.  Offered in fall semesters in traditional format.
  
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    PSYC 2003 General Psychology

    3 credits
    A general survey of the science of human behavior, designed to acquaint the student with principles of human development, learning, behavior, and with the experimental methods of psychology. PSYC 200L   is a required corequisite for PSYC 2003 for Psychology majors.
  
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    PSYC 3013 Topics in Counseling

    3 credits
    Examines selected advanced or specialized topics in counseling. The topics vary from semester to semester. This course may be taken twice for credit. Prerequisite: PSYC 2003 General Psychology .
  
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    PSYC 3103 Child Development

    3 credits
    A study of the child from conception to late childhood. Particular emphasis will be given to the physical, cognitive, moral, social, and personality development of the child. The interrelationship of biological and cultural factors will be considered. Offered every fall semester. Prerequisite: PSYC 2003 .
  
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    PSYC 3113 Adolescent Development

    3 credits
    A study of development from childhood to adulthood. Physical, emotional, cognitive, and social-growth patterns will be considered. Practical applications of theory and research will be made, as this course seeks to prepare people to work with early to later adolescents. Prerequisite:  PSYC 2003 General Psychology .
  
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    PSYC 3123 Human Growth and Development

    3 credits
    An introductory course to human growth and development from conception through the different life stages. Will emphasize physical growth, cognitive development, personality development, and social interactions. Offered every spring semester. Prerequisite: PSYC 2003 .
  
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    PSYC 3133 Adulthood Development and Aging

    3 credits
    A focus on human development from early to late adulthood. Topics include dynamics of mid-life crisis, death and dying, disorders in aging (Alzheimer’s, for example) and the process of aging.
  
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    PSYC 3143 Human-Information Processing

    3 credits
    An introductory course in human-information processing, focusing on three domains (and their interaction in human behavior): perception, cognition, and emotion. Research methods in this domain will be considered, as well as a number of applied issues. Offered every fall semester. Prerequisite: PSYC 2003 .
  
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    PSYC 3253 Psychological Assessment

    3 credits
    A survey of major approaches to psychological assessment. Psychometric theory is introduced, and practice work is done in administration and interpretation of selected tests. EDUC 3523  is not identical.
  
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    PSYC 3353 Forensic Psychology

    3 credits
    A general survey of psychology, the legal system, and their interaction. A number of special issues will be considered, such as eyewitness memory, and the insanity defense. Consideration will be given to Christian perspectives on specific issues.
  
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    PSYC 3363 Applied Psychopathology

    3 hours
    This course addresses the principles of diagnosis of psychopathology and the use of current diagnostic tools, including the current edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM). Includes psychiatric terminology, treatment, current research, cross cultural impact, ethical implications, and goal planning related to mental health processes and case management.
  
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    PSYC 3403 Social Psychology

    3 credits
    The impact of social institutions and processes on behavior of the individual and of the individual upon groups. An analysis of the concepts and processes involved in the development of social goals and behaviors. Topics include attitude formation and change, public opinion, propaganda and group phenomena, leadership, tension aggression, conflict and methods of resolution. Offered every fall semester. Prerequisite: PSYC 2003 .
  
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    PSYC 3404 Physiology of Behavior

    4 credits
    Designed to investigate the anatomical and physiological basis of human behavior, including the physiological bases of disorders which affect human behavior. Prerequisite: BIOL 1004 or PSYC 2003.  Recommended prerequisites: BIOL 3204 and 3214. Includes laboratory.
  
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    PSYC 3413 Abnormal Psychology

    3 credits
    The major forms of behavioral pathology with an emphasis on understanding, treatment, and prevention of these disorders. Prerequisite: PSYC 2003 .
  
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    PSYC 3423 Working with Children

    3 Hours
    This course is designed to familiarize students with some basic issues and techniques involved in working with children.  This course focuses on children who have not generally reached puberty and/or who are younger than the stage we normally consider as adolescence (typically, 2-4 years old until about 11 years of age).
  
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    PSYC 3453 Developmental Disorders of Childhood and Adolescence

    3 credits
    This course examines developmental disorders typically occurring in infancy, childhood, and adolescence.  Topics include:  Reactive Attachment Disorder, Oppositional Defiant Disorder, Intellectual Disability, Autism Spectrum Disorder, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Conduct Disorder, among others.  The etiology, assessment, and treatment options of developmental disorders are also explored.
  
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    PSYC 3603 Personality

    3 credits
    This first half of this course focuses on surveying and evaluating secular theories of personality from scientific and Christian perspectives. The second half of the course emphasizes the development of a comprehensive, Christian theory of personality. Prerequisite: PSYC 2003 .
  
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    PSYC 3713 Introduction to Counseling

    3 credits
    An introductory course on the theories and techniques of individual and group counseling, stages of other counseling processes, the use of background materials and tests in counseling, counseling settings, and the counselor as a person. Prerequisite: PSYC 2003 .
  
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    PSYC 3733 Group Dynamics

    3 credits
    This course examines and applies foundational principles of group development, dynamics, and theories in relation to group counseling and therapy.  Leadership styles and ethical and legal issues related to group interventions are discussed. Note:  Offered on a 2-year cycle.
  
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    PSYC 3743 Crisis Intervention

    3 credits
    This course examines foundational principles and practices in trauma and crisis intervention.  An emphasis is placed on application of basic principles and practices to a range of situations and interventions. Note:  Offered on a 2-year cycle.
  
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    PSYC 3753 Practical Counseling Skills

    3 credits
    Counseling skills, techniques, and therapeutic factors involved in meeting client needs and goals. Includes brief overview of counseling theories and opportunities to build and practice skills and techniques. Prerequisite: PSYC 3713  
  
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    PSYC 3763 Multicultural Counseling

    3 credits
    This course will focus on counseling techniques used to serve multi-ethnic populations. Various counseling techniques will be used to help students explore the significance of culture, religion, counseling competencies and ethical practices among these diverse groups. A key component will be the standards outlined by the Association for Multicultural Counseling & Development. Prerequisite: PSYC 3753 
  
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    PSYC 3811 Junior Seminar

    1 credit
    This course explores a range of issues, including career/professional development issues and the assessment of knowledge of psychological theories and procedures. Note:  Required of all psychology majors.  Offered in fall semesters in traditional format.
  
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    PSYC 4003 Studies in Psychology

    Variable credit
    Study of any topics in psychology meeting the approval of the Division Chair and the Dean. Offered on sufficient demand. Prerequisite: PSYC 2003 .
  
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    PSYC 4013 Studies in Psychology/London Experience

    3 credits
    A study of the influence on psychology of individuals in English thought and history. The contributions to the helping professions of Galton, Freud, Eysenck, Nightingale and others will be examined. Visits to the Freud Museum, The Museum of Natural History, The Florence Nightingale Museum and other sites will be included in the London itinerary. Permission to register must be secured from the Director of the London Experience prior to registration.
  
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    PSYC 4453 Negotiation and Conflict Resolution

    3 credits
    The development of the communication and management skills essential for successfully resolving conflict situations involving both labor and management practices. Uses simulation, case studies, and field-work assignments. Prerequisite: PSYC 2003 .
  
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    PSYC 4903 Independent Study

    Variable credit

Recreation

  
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    RECR 1001 Badminton and Tennis

    1 credit
    Designed to acquaint students with individual and team activities; all are graded P/NC. Courses may be repeated for elective credit.
  
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    RECR 1011 Bowling

    1 credit
    Designed to acquaint students with individual and team activities; all are graded P/NC. Courses may be repeated for elective credit.
  
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    RECR 1051 Golf

    1 credit
    Designed to acquaint students with individual and team activities; all are graded P/NC. Courses may be repeated for elective credit.
  
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    RECR 1061 Essentials of Strength Training

    1 credit
    Designed to acquaint students with individual and team activities; all are graded P/NC. Courses may be repeated for elective credit.
  
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    RECR 1081 Kayaking

    1 credit
    Designed to acquaint students with individual and team activities; all are graded P/NC. Courses may be repeated for elective credit. Additional course fee of $40 is required.
  
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    RECR 1091 Martial Arts

    1 credit
    Designed to acquaint students with individual and team activities; all are graded P/NC. Courses may be repeated for elective credit.
  
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    RECR 1122 Wilderness Leadership Skills

    2 credits
    A foundation course designed to develop wilderness-leadership skills of the participants thereby enhancing their personal enjoyment of the outdoors, the conservation of wild areas, and improving the safety of outdoor trips.
  
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    RECR 1131 Cooperative Recreational Games

    1 credit
    An introductory course for students who plan to work with children and youth. Enables the student to understand the nature and philosophy of cooperative recreation and to create and lead non-competitive, cooperative games and activities.
  
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    RECR 1171 Ballroom Dance

    1 credit
    This course is designed to introduce and instruct students in the art of ballroom dance on a social, casual basis. Students will be exposed to ballroom etiquette and instructed in the basics and a variety of patterns in the rumba, cha-cha and tango. Additional course fee of $225 is required.
  
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    RECR 1201 Scuba

    1 credit
    Designed to acquaint students with individual and team activities; all are graded P/NC. Courses may be repeated for elective credit. Additional course fee of $300 is required.
  
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    RECR 2003 Introduction to Recreation and Sport Management

    3 credits
    A foundation course dealing with the role that recreation and sport have in our society. Introduces theories of social and economic factors concerning recreation and sport management. Involves the history of recreation and sport in the world and in particular the United States. Additionally, governance structures and organizations related to recreation and sport will be discussed, to include local parks and recreation departments, intercollegiate athletics, the business of recreation and sport, as well as professional organizations and sport finance.
  
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    RECR 3023 Management and Leadership in Recreation and Sport

    3 credits
    Recreation systems (public and private) analyzed from the standpoint of organization, administration, finances, training, legislation, public relations, and coordination of community resources. Principles and methods of program development. Supervisory skills indigenous to public and/or private agency sports programs. Additionally, detailed structures and functions of intercollegiate, professional, and international organizations will be investigated.
  
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    RECR 3033 Camp Counseling and Administration

    3 credits
    Gives prospective-camp counselors and directors an understanding of the total camp program, duties and responsibilities of camp personnel, and various camp program skills. Emphasis on program planning, staff selection and development, health and safety, and evaluation.
  
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    RECR 3043 Recreation and Sport Facilities Management

    3 credits
    A study of sport and recreation planning principles, processes, and trends in facility development. Also includes maintenance techniques, materials use, job planning, and scheduling of facility use. Prerequisite: RECR 2003  
  
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    RECR 3103 Sports Communication

    3 hours
    Students will learn the fundamentals of communicating in a sports environment.  Includes the basics of communicating for print and broadcast news, as well as communicating for sports information and public interviews.  Also covers spiritual and ethical considerations in sports communications. Prerequisite:ENGL 2103  
  
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    RECR 3173 Outdoor Recreation

    3 credits
    Examines the many factors specifically related to administration of outdoor recreation facilities, activities, programs, and education with an emphasis on risk management, safety, and planning. Prerequisite: RECR 2003 .
  
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    RECR 3203 Legal Issues in Physical Education, Recreation, and Sport

    3 credits
    A study of the law relative to physical education, recreation and sport, with attention to tort law, liability issues and contracts as they relate to the fields. Prerequisite: RECR 2003 .
  
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    RECR 3253 Professional and Ethical Issues in Recreation and Sport Management

    3 credits
    Global trends impacting recreation and sport management, including change drivers and their counter-forces will be examined. Topics include diversity, environment, technology, transportation, values, demography, economy, health, work and free time, and governance. This course will also include recreation service delivery to special populations. It will also include analyzing problems confronting disadvantaged individuals and groups including the aging, economically disadvantaged, mentally challenged, physically disabled, and youth. Prerequisite: RECR 2003 .
  
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    RECR 3443 Marketing and Promotion for Recreation and Sport

    3 credits
    Provides students with basic knowledge and practical experience for developing strategic-marketing techniques specific to recreation and sport management. An integral part of this course will include the examination of regional agencies and organizations presently engaged in recreation and sport promotion, with special attention being given to the methods employed to attract participants as well as spectators.
  
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    RECR 3513 Internship Seminar for Recreation and Sport Management

    3 credits
    Students who have chosen to work in recreation or a sport management setting may be eligible for placement in a internship setting, but will also have elements of a traditional course. Such students will receive supervised training in a setting appropriate to their interests. This experience is designed to take place ideally in the sophomore (second) year, but no later than the junior year. This course is designed to give students an experience beyond the snapshot from the introduction course, but not the length and depth of the 12 hour, semester long internship. Maximum credit: 3 semester hours.
  
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    RECR 4003 Capstone for Recreation and Sport Management

    3 credits
    This course will serve as a capstone course type of experience whereby students will have a major research paper to complete, they will examine current issues and trends in the recreation and sports world, develop and hone resume and interviewing skills, as well as be required to give their testimony in a setting away from campus (Church setting, civic club, etc.). Additionally, students will have an opportunity to have a dialogue with guest speakers in a roundtable format who are experts in their fields from this region of the country.
  
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    RECR 4600 Internship in Recreation and Sport Management

    Variable credit
    Varied practical on-the-job experience in one of many recreation or sport management agencies (for example, public-recreation departments, YM/YWCA, Boys/Girls Clubs, church recreation programs, camps, intercollegiate athletic programs, professional sport organizations, facilities, gyms, etc.). Students are supervised in directing, supervising, and managing recreation and sport management activities. Credit up to twelve hours.

Religion

  
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    RELG 2013 Introduction to Intercultural Ministry

    3 credits
    A study of goals, objectives, and strategies required for effective ministry across cultural and geographical boundaries. Attention to short-term missions, urban and cross-cultural ministries within North America, and intercultural communication.
  
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    RELG 2023 Cross-Cultural Ministry Experience

    3 credits
    Open to students who will be participating in a cross-cultural ministry experience. Designed to help them prepare for, participate in, and reflect upon entering into and ministering with persons in a culture other than their own. Pre-trip and post-trip reading and writing assignments are required. The cross-cultural ministry experience must take place during the term in which the student registers for the course. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
  
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    RELG 2103 American Religious History

    3 credits
    The development of religion in America from the Colonial period to the present. Attention to all branches of the Christian faith–Protestantism, Roman Catholicism, and Eastern Orthodoxy–and to non-Christian religions, as well as to variant groups. A special focus on the role of religion in American life.
  
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    RELG 2123 Religions of the World

    3 credits
    A study of the history and the fundamental teachings of the dominant religions of the world. The basic principles of evangelical Christianity will be used as a standard for evaluating these religions. Prerequisite: RELG 2403 Basic Christian Beliefs  or permission of the instructor.
  
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    RELG 2403 Basic Christian Beliefs

    3 credits
    An introduction to the basics of the Christian faith, focusing on the biblical and doctrinal truths common to all denominations. (Prerequisite: BIBL 1003 , BIBL 1013 , or BIBL 1023 )
  
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    RELG 2423 Bible and Contemporary Issues

    3 credits
    Explores contemporary issues of modern living (such as relationships, stewardship, charity, care for others, personal ethics, immigration, human trafficking, race relations, definitions of success, and others) in the light of the message of the Bible. Texts from both the Old and New Testaments will be explored to strengthen the foundation for understanding living as a Christian in today’s culture and becoming transformative agents in that culture.
  
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    RELG 2551 Ministry Practicum I

    1 credit
    A three-semester program with sequential format giving practical exposure, experience and evaluation in ministry. Placement in a parish setting with a supervising minister will be followed up through a system of reporting and reflection. Prerequisites: RELG 2703 . Also must be taken in sequence and RELG 3551  and RELG 4551  require upper division status in the Division of Religion. For Youth & Children’s Ministry concentrations, SPFD 3551 Spiritual Formation and Discipleship Practicum  substitutes for RELG 3551 .
  
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    RELG 2603 Contemporary Cults

    3 credits
    Examines the causes and psychosocial dynamics of cults and looks specifically at some current cults on the American scene.
  
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    RELG 2703 Launching your Ministry

    3 credits
    An introduction to ministry that includes focus on God’s call to ministry; exploration of various options and dimensions of vocational ministry; exploration of personal faith, interests, personality, talents, and gifts for ministry; spiritual foundations and habits in ministry; and an introduction to a praxis approach to learning in ministry through practicum settings. (Normally serves as prerequisite to practicum course sequence - RELG 2551 , RELG 3551 , & RELG 4551 )
  
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    RELG 2803 Biblical Foundations of Christian Mission

    3 credits
    A foundation for the biblical and theological basis for missionary mandate, along with a general overview of the global-missionary enterprise of the church.
  
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    RELG 2901 Personal Bible Study

    1 credit
    A survey of the resources, models, and techniques available for enhancing a Christian’s time with the Word.
  
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    RELG 2921 Christian Devotional Classics

    1 credit
    The best in a rich heritage of devotional literature from Augustine, Bunyan, and the Wesleys to modern writers like Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Elisabeth Elliot, and C. S. Lewis.
  
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    RELG 2931 Theology and Practice of Prayer

    1 credit
    Thinking through the meaning, uses, and forms of public and private prayer as a vital component of devotion and spiritual development.
  
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    RELG 3001 Religion Seminar

    1 credit
    A seminar for juniors and seniors who are majoring in religion. Emphasis on current developments in the field of religion. P/NC.
  
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    RELG 3011 Seminar: Special Topics in Mission Studies

    1 credit
    Designed for an interactive examination of current issues and developments in Christian missions.
  
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    RELG 3013 Missional Outreach in Ministry

    3 credits
    An introduction to biblical and theological foundations for local, intercultural, and global ministries. Attention is given to understanding the cultural context of ministry, the conversion experience, and the methods and process of discipleship in a variety of cultural contexts. Strategies for local church health and growth, as well as participation in both local and global outreach are explored.
  
  
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    RELG 3043 Ministry in Cultural Context

    3 credits
    Explores the methodology for and practice of examining any ministry context - including exploration of the history and culture of the people, as well as unique features of worldview and/or particular theological views. Attention is given to demonstrating how deeper understanding and a Christian attitude of love foster sensitivity and respect for one’s own and other cultures and help develop strategies for effective outreach of the Gospel. [Missional engagement courses such as The Missional Church, Urban Ministry Plunge, Church Planting, and others may be substituted for this course, since they give attention to the same aspects of contextualizing ministry.]
  
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    RELG 3103 Evangelism and Church Health

    3 credits
    An introduction to the biblical and theological foundations for local and intercultural missions. Attention is given to understanding the culture, the conversion experience, and discipline. Strategies for local church growth and participating in missions are explored.
  
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    RELG 3113 Evangelism and Church Planting

    3 credits
    A study of procedures and strategies appropriate for establishing and developing new congregations. Includes social context, potential needs, resources, action plan, and reporting accountability.
  
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    RELG 3203 Survey of Christian Denominations

    3 credits
    A comparative study of contemporary denominations and their teachings.
  
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    RELG 3213 Church Leadership and Planning

    3 credits
    Leadership course that focuses on pastoral role in guiding the visioning and planning processes of the local church.
  
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    RELG 3383 Theology for Ministry I

    3 credits
    A study of the traditional doctrines of Christianity from an evangelical and Wesleyan perspective in a systematic manner, including an overview of the study of theology, as well as the sources of theology, theological method, the nature of revelation, the nature and attributes of God, the doctrine of the Trinity, creation, the human condition and sin, and the nature and work of Jesus Christ.
  
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    RELG 3393 Theology for Ministry II

    3 credits
    A study of the traditional doctrines of Christianity from an evangelical and Wesleyan perspective in a systematic manner, including Christology and the doctrine of salvation, the doctrine and work of the Holy Spirit, the nature and ministry of the church, the means of grace, and a consideration of God’s ultimate purpose and final acts in human history. Also includes some consideration of issues of hermeneutics, theological method, and the praxis of theology and ministry. Prerequisite: RELG 3383 .
  
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    RELG 3422 Faith & Practice in The Wesleyan Church

    2 credits
    A study of the Discipline of The Wesleyan Church, focusing on the denomination’s beliefs, ethos, and system of government. An overview of parliamentary law is included as an aid to pastoral leadership in church business sessions. (This is an elective course that should be completed by every Wesleyan student pursuing any form of ministerial credentials.)
  
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    RELG 3503 Apologetics

    3 credits
    The inspiration, authority, and history of the Bible, studied with a view to establishing in the hearts and minds of the students the principles of the Christian faith. Prerequisite: RELG 2403  or permission of the instructor.
  
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    RELG 3551 Ministry Practicum II

    1 credit
    A three-semester program with sequential format giving practical exposure, experience and evaluation in ministry. Placement in a parish setting with a supervising minister will be followed up through a system of reporting and reflection. Prerequisites: RELG 2703 . Also must be taken in sequence and RELG 3551 and RELG 4551  require upper division status in the Division of Religion. For Youth & Children’s Ministry concentrations, SPFD 3551 Spiritual Formation and Discipleship Practicum  substitutes for RELG 3551.
  
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    RELG 3556 Ministry Residency I

    6 hours
    A semester (usually Fall) residency program giving extensive practical exposure and experience to students in a ministry setting under the mentorship of skilled practitioners.  Prerequisite: A cumulative 2.7 GPA must be achieved by the end of a potential resident student’s junior year in order to qualify for this ministerial residency.
 

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