Dec 15, 2019  
2018-2019 Undergraduate Bulletin 
    
2018-2019 Undergraduate Bulletin [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


All courses are offered yearly, upon sufficient demand, unless indicated otherwise. Those courses offered on an alternate-year basis have the next academic year of availability indicated by a date within parentheses immediately following the course description.

Courses may be offered in a variety of formats, including online.

Although the course generally will be offered on a regular basis, the university reserves the right to introduce or delete courses, depending on sufficient demand.

Those courses graded on a Pass/No Credit basis only are indicated by P/NC.

Institutional credit only (S/NC) does not give graduation credit but does count toward full loads.

The fourth digit in the course number indicates the number of semester credit hours.

 

Business

  
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    BUSI 3503 Business Calculus and Forecasting

    3 credits
    This course introduces the basic concepts of calculus and its applications to business and economics.  It will focus on basic calculus concepts including single and multivariable derivatives as well as additional statistics topics such as regression and forecasting. Prerequisites:  STAT 3123  and MATH 1053  or higher level math or placement test.

Chemistry

  
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    CHEM 1004 General Chemistry I

    4 credits
    Principles of inorganic chemistry as illustrated by important elements, compounds, and reactions. Prerequisite: Score of 500 or better on Math SAT (ACT 20) or College Algebra and Trig or higher level math. Additional laboratory fee of $65 is required.
  
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    CHEM 1054 General Chemistry II

    4 credits
    Introduction to physical chemistry and qualitative analysis. Prerequisite:  CHEM 1004  with a minimum grade of C-. Additional laboratory fee of $65 is required.
  
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    CHEM 1104 Introduction to Chemistry

    4 credits
    Students will learn the basic principles and practical applications of chemistry. Topics: measurement, ionic and covalent compounds, chemical calculations, states of matter; energy, solutions, reactions, chemical bonding, gases, and acids and bases. Laboratory components consist of learning the principles of experimental design and record keeping, developing concepts regarding accuracy and precision of experimental data, and learning how to report scientific findings. Prerequisite: Algebra I and II or satisfactory high school Math SAT score or MATH 1053 . This course is recommended for students who plan to take College General Chemistry but had no or did not do well in chemistry course in high school or those who have been out of college for a long time and are coming back to school.  Additional laboratory fee of $65 is required.
  
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    CHEM 2504 Organic Chemistry I

    4 credits
    Study of the preparations and reactions of the various organic functional groups with emphasis upon the mechanisms of the reactions. Prerequisites: CHEM 1004  and CHEM 1054 . Additional laboratory fee of $65 is required.
  
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    CHEM 2514 Organic Chemistry II

    4 credits
    Study of the preparations and reactions of the various organic functional groups with emphasis upon the mechanisms of the reactions. Prerequisite: CHEM 2504  with a minimum grade of C-. Additional laboratory fee of $65 is required.
  
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    CHEM 2900 Chemistry Studies

    Variable credit (1-4 hours)
    Any topic in chemistry meeting the approval of the Division Chair and Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. These courses are variable credit and may be directed or independent study or experimental courses for individuals or for a group of students. Prerequisite:  Consent of instructor.
  
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    CHEM 3254 Biochemistry

    4 credits
    A study of physiologically significant organic molecules. Prerequisites: BIOL 1004  and CHEM 1054 .  Recommended prerequisite: CHEM 2504 . Additional laboratory fee of $65 is required.
  
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    CHEM 3404 Inorganic Analysis

    4 credits
    Analysis of inorganic compounds and inorganic elements in organometallic compounds. Prerequisite: CHEM 1054 . Additional laboratory fee of $65 is required.
  
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    CHEM 3414 Organic Analysis

    4 credits
    Chemical and instrumental methods commonly used on organic compounds and mixtures. Prerequisite: CHEM 2504 . Additional laboratory fee of $65 is required.
  
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    CHEM 3454 Physical Chemistry I

    4 credits
    Includes the gaseous state, thermodynamics, chemical equilibria, and atomic and molecular structure, from both experimental and theoretical points of view. Prerequisites: CHEM 1054 , MATH 3524  , and PHYS 2044 . Additional laboratory fee of $65 is required.
  
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    CHEM 3464 Physical Chemistry II

    4 credits
    Continuation of CHEM 3454 , including chemical kinetics, liquid and solid state, phase equilibria, solutions, electrochemistry and surfaces. Prerequisite: CHEM 3454 . Additional laboratory fee of $65 is required.
  
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    CHEM 4000 Chemistry Studies

    Variable credit (1-4 hours)
    Any topic in chemistry meeting the approval of the division chair and the dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. Courses numbered 4001-4009 are directed study by individuals. Graded P/NC. Offered on sufficient demand. Prerequisites:  Junior or Senior standing and consent of instructor.
  
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    CHEM 4100 Chemistry Studies

    Variable Credit (1-4 hours)
    Courses numbered 4101-4119 are experimental courses. Offered on sufficient demand. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing and consent of instructor.
  
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    CHEM 4800 Chemistry Senior Internship

    Variable credit (1-4 hours)
    An internship off-campus, to provide professional development for senior-level students. Prerequisites:  Junior or Senior standing and consent of instructor. Graded P/NC.
  
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    CHEM 4900 Independent Study

    Variable credit (1-3 hours)
    Prerequisite:  Consent of instructor.
  
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    CHEM 4993 Research in Chemistry

    3 credits
    Prerequisite:  Consent of instructor.

Communication

  
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    COMM 1003 Introduction to Communication Studies

    3 credits
    Students will develop an understanding of the broad academic discipline of communication. Students will learn biblical principles of communication, as well as research and presentation skills needed for the major.
  
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    COMM 1203 History of Media

    3 credits
    Students will understand the significance of media history. Students will study key people, events, and discoveries that have shaped modern media and will learn how past events impact future media developments.
  
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    COMM 1503 Multi-Media Production

    3 credits
    Students will learn the basics of digital audio and video production. Students will learn techniques of non-linear editing, vocal performance, and digital storytelling.
  
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    COMM 2123 Interpersonal Communication

    3 credits
    Students will discover their personal communication patterns.  Students will learn the process of interpreting messages of others within diverse contexts and initial steps toward resolving conflicts.
  
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    COMM 2143 Intercultural Communication

    3 credtis
    Students will discover how to become ethically responsible intercultural communicators.  Students will learn the process of interpreting messages of others within diverse cultural contexts, as well as the initial steps in resolving intercultural conflicts. This course is designed to assist students in adapting to the global perspectives in today’s world.
  
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    COMM 2153 Introduction to Journalism

    3 credits
    Students will learn the essentials of journalistic writing.  They will create a portfolio demonstrating their writing abilities. Prerequisites: ENGL 1003  and ENGL 1013 .
  
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    COMM 2303 Persuasion

    3 credits
    Students will learn the theories and techniques of classical and modern persuasion and will discover how persuasion works in both mediated and non-mediated contexts, such as advertising and debate.  Students will apply theories of persuasion to a contemporary media campaign of their own creation.
  
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    COMM 2403 Introduction to Popular Culture

    3 credits
    Students will learn the importance of popular culture in society and various Christian responses to popular culture. Students will also evaluate their personal attitudes toward popular culture.
  
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    COMM 2503 Introduction to Digital Media

    3 credits
    Students will learn the basics of producing content for digital and internet media. Students will learn web-page construction and elements of graphic design.
  
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    COMM 2603 Persuasion and Rhetoric

    3 credits
    An exploration of the historical and theoretical aspects of persuasion and rhetoric. In addition to studying their historical roots, students will learn the theories and techniques of classical and modern persuasion and will discover how persuasion works in both mediated and non-mediated contexts, such as advertising and debate. As part of the study, students will apply theories of persuasion and rhetoric to a contemporary media campaign of their own creation.
  
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    COMM 3003 Communication Theory

    3 credits
    Students will learn the complex dynamics of the communication process.  Specifically, students will learn different models and theories of communication in interpersonal, group, mediated, and cultural contexts. Prerequisite: COMM 1003 .
  
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    COMM 3063 Media and Communication Theory

    3 credits
    An overview of the different models and theories of communication in interpersonal, group, mediated, and cultural contexts. Students will learn how the form of any communication influences its content and will learn to craft messages appropriate to particular medium and audience. Included in the course are examinations of the work of Marshall McLuhan, Neil Postman and other theorists of modern media studies. Prerequisite: COMM 1003  
  
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    COMM 3153 Reporting

    3 credits
    Students will learn the essentials of reporting for public media. Students will enhance their writing and storytelling skills and interviewing abilities. Students will encounter the servant role of journalism by authoring stories involving marginalized people groups. Prerequisites: COMM 1503  and COMM 2153 .
  
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    COMM 3203 Rhetorical Theory

    3 credits
    Students will discover the historical roots of rhetoric and persuasion.  Students will learn the utility of rhetoric in deepening their understanding of media and popular culture. Prerequisite: COMM 2303 .
  
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    COMM 3403 Media Criticism

    3 credits
    Students will learn the techniques and theories of media criticism. Students will learn to investigate media artifacts, such as films, television shows, and popular music, and interpret their possible meanings and messages. Prerequisite: COMM 3203 .
  
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    COMM 3703 Communication and the Christian Faith

    3 credits
    Students will learn the various ways Christians use mediated communication and the controversies associated with those uses. Students will learn how to create messages that serve diverse Christian audiences.
  
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    COMM 3713 Special Topics in Media Communication

    3 credits
    A study of a specialized topic or contemporary issue within the field of Media Communication.  The specific topic of the course will be determined by Media Communication faculty based on faculty and student interest and availability of resources. Note: No grade of less than 2.0 (C) will be accepted for work in major courses.  If you are taking this course and are a Media Communication major, you must earn a 2.0 (C) or higher for this course to fulfill a degree requirement.
  
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    COMM 3753 Media Law

    3 credits
    Students will study significant legal cases that govern modern-media industries.  Students will learn the importance of the First Amendment to current journalism practices, laws that affect the reporting process, and legal decisions related to defamation, privacy, and broadcast media.
  
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    COMM 4243 Media and Society

    3 credits
    Students will deepen their understanding of the social role of media and popular culture in society by learning how they help shape social norms.  Students will trace the development of social movements by discovering their genesis in the media and following its progression to public policy. Prerequisites: COMM 2403  and COMM 3403 .
  
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    COMM 4453 Seminar in Media and Society

    3 credits
    This seminar will help students to further develop their understanding of the roles of media and popular culture in society by learning how they help shape social norms. Students will deepen their understanding of specialized topics within popular culture, such as advertising, film genres, or television shows, or video games. This course will also trace the development of social movements by discovering their genesis in the media and following its progression to public policy. Prerequisites: COMM 2403  and COMM 3403 .
  
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    COMM 4503 Public Relations

    3 credits
    Students will learn how news content is uniquely portrayed on the web.  Students will combine elements of writing, reporting, and media production into a functioning website that serves the public. Prerequisites: COMM 1503 , COMM 2503 , COMM 3153 .
  
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    COMM 4603 Documentary and Investigative Reporting

    3 credits
    A study of the concepts, techniques, and best practices for investigative and long format reporting for multiple platforms including print, film, broadcast, and digital documentary-style storytelling. As a group, students will research and create a team report that will cover one major social issue; they will also produce a “Webumentary” Web site to include written, multimedia, and interactive stories covering the various aspects of that issue from a Christian perspective. Prerequisite: COMM 2503  
  
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    COMM 4703 Communication Ethics and Law

    3 credits
    A study of how ethics and law relate to communication. Students will learn various ethical systems and how they influence decision-making in communication, as well as how to choose and apply ethical approaches in various situations. Students will also study how to view communication-related dilemmas from a Christian perspective and discern the differences between ethics and law by reviewing case studies of both ethics and media law. Prerequisite: Senior standing or instructor approval.
  
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    COMM 4803 Strategic Communication

    3 credits
    This course explores how content is uniquely produced to promote a specific point of view on events and issues of importance to government, business, or NGOs. As part of the learning experience, students will combine elements of writing, reporting, and media production and channel them into a creative outlet that serves the public, such as a functioning Web site. Prerequisites: COMM 1503 , COMM 2603 , COMM 3063 .
  
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    COMM 4903 Communication Capstone

    3 credits
    Students will demonstrate proficiency in their chosen concentration. Students in the Media Presentation concentration will create professional media content via a chosen internship. Students in the Mass Media Studies concentration will author a major thesis for submission to a professional conference. Prerequisite: Senior standing. Course graded P/F.
  
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    COMM 4983 Communication Independent Study

    Variable credit
    Students will undertake an academic project related to their interests. Topics assigned after collaboration with the student’s advisor. Students are required to publicly present the results of their research.

Computing

  
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    CPSC 1003 Fundamentals of Programming

    3 credits
    Introduction to the application of program development concepts and tools. Use of such tools as pseudo-code and flowcharting to produce top-down structured solutions to business and scientific applications. Emphasis given to basic logic, program documentation and debugging.
  
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    CPSC 1103 Introduction to Computers and Information Processing

    3 credits
    Introduction to the history, vocabulary, and use of computer information systems. Includes word- processing, spreadsheet, and presentation applications using the integrated package, Microsoft Office. For a testing fee of $80, students may take a challenge exam for CPSC 1103.  Information concerning preparing for the exam and scheduling is available from the Center for Teaching Excellence (864-644-5038).  Students who have previously failed CPSC 1103 at SWU and students who are currently enrolled in the course are not eligible to take the challenge exam.  There is no provision for a retest.  No credit will be awarded for computer fundamental classes that are more than five years old at the time a student transfers or is re-admitted to SWU.
  
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    CPSC 1203 Introduction to the Internet, Online Research, and Web-Site Design

    3 credits
    Topics include the history, evolution, structure, and management of the Internet; the influence of the Internet on society; locating and synthesizing information online; Hypertext Markup Language; and building web pages.
  
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    CPSC 1903 Introduction to Computer-Science Programming

    3 credits
    Introduction to programming and basic computer science principles and algorithms. Topics include fundamental computer science theory, number systems, thinking strategies, Tanenbaum’s virtual machine, recursion, data structures, and addressing. Recommended prerequisite: CPSC 1003 .
  
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    CPSC 2103 Advanced Software

    3 credits
    Advanced topics in word processing, spreadsheets, databases, electronic presentations, the Internet, and the integration of all, using the Windows operating system and Microsoft Office. Prerequisite: CPSC 1103 .
  
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    CPSC 2253 Object-Oriented Programming I

    3 credits
    Introduction to object-oriented design and programming using a modern object programming language. Studying language syntax, program construction, and debugging techniques provides the foundation to design and implement new solutions for common business applications. Recommended prerequisite: CPSC 1903 .
  
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    CPSC 2293 Web Page Design and Programming

    3 credits
    Web page design and programming syntax and use of HTML and DHTML to implement those designs. Design elements include text, forms, tables, frames, graphics, sound, white space, images, animation, and intra-page, intra-site, and inter-site hyperlinks. Introduction to scripting and XML. Recommended prerequisite:  CPSC 1103 .
  
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    CPSC 2303 Hardware and Software Configuration and Support

    3 credits
    Concepts of PC hardware and software configuration and help-desk technical support in a business environment. Troubleshooting and hardware peripheral maintenance and repair, basic application installations, printer maintenance, and end-user public relations. Recommended prerequisite: CPSC 1903 . Includes lab. Lab tools required.
  
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    CPSC 2453 Special Topics I

    3 credits
    Advanced programming techniques including possible topics of indirection, recursion, and conceptual development and implementation of data structures including arrays, records, linear lists, stacks, queues, trees, tables, and graphs. Other topics may include applications writing involving strings, sorting, searching, and file operations.  Recommended prerequisite: CPSC 1903 .
  
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    CPSC 2503 Networking I

    3 credits
    A study of the protocols employed to implement business and organizational solutions on an intranet or the Internet. Analysis of available hardware and software used in the design of networks and the respective cost/benefit tradeoffs. Recommended prerequisite: CPSC 1903 .
  
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    CPSC 3003 Database Design and Implementation I

    3 credits
    Methods of database planning, design, and development. Management topics include data integrity, privacy, and security. File systems, hierarchical and networked databases, and relational-online databases. Recommended prerequisite: CPSC 1903 .
  
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    CPSC 3013 Database Design and Implementation II

    3 credits
    Advanced database design, creation, maintenance, and security using the SQL or SQL type language. The online databases will be implemented using current database engines and interfaces. Prerequisite:  CPSC 3003 .
  
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    CPSC 3103 Systems Analysis and Design

    3 credits
    Theory and practice of determining data flow in a small enterprise environment. The Systems Development Life Cycle methodology will be the process used to develop appropriate solutions. Local business case studies will serve as class projects. Recommended prerequisites: CPSC 2503  and CPSC 3003 .
  
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    CPSC 3153 Theory of Computing

    3 credits
    Computing theory is explored through the study of languages (regular and context-free), automata (finite and pushdown), Turing machines, and complexity theory. Recommended prerequisites: CPSC 1903 , CPSC 2503 , and CPSC 2303 .
  
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    CPSC 3303 Object-Oriented Programming II

    3 credits
    Advanced study of the concepts and application of an Object-Oriented Event Driven (OOED) approach to developing solutions to business problems. Prerequisite: CPSC 2253 .
  
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    CPSC 3354 Operating Systems and Servers

    4 credits
    Design concepts of advanced PC operating systems. Focus on modern operating systems and server theory, as well as hands-on lab projects. Recommended prerequisites: CPSC 2303  and CPSC 2503 .
  
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    CPSC 3623 Networking II

    3 credits
    The techniques employed to implement business/organizational networking solutions. Includes transmission media, client-server strategies, throughput and response time, systems architecture, and cost/benefit tradeoffs. Prerequisite: CPSC 2503 .
  
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    CPSC 3633 Networking III

    3 credits
    An advanced study of protocols employed to implement business/organizational networking solutions. An in-depth analysis of available hardware and software used in the design of networks and the respective cost/benefit tradeoffs. Prerequisite: CPSC 2503 .
  
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    CPSC 4000 Studies in Computer Science

    Variable credit
    Any topic in computer science meeting the approval of the division chair and the dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. Variable credit.  Courses numbered 4001-4009 are directed study by individuals.  Graded P/NC. Offered on sufficient demand.
  
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    CPSC 4202 Computer Science Senior Capstone

    2 credits
    A focus on both ethical issues of Computer Science and integration of information literacy. Students will develop and defend, both in writing and presentation, an ethical viewpoint on one or more situations. Prerequisite:  Junior or Senior standing.
  
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    CPSC 4303 Advanced Scripting and Common Language Interfaces

    3 credits
    A study of the advanced programming techniques of powerful scripting languages. Students will analyze scripts and design new applets. Strong focus on design, documentation, and debugging. Recommended prerequisites: CPSC 3003  and CPSC 3103 .
  
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    CPSC 4423 Advanced Networking Applications

    3 credits
    An advanced study of network applications and protocols to implement networking solutions. Analysis of available hardware and software used in the design of network support. Prerequisite: CPSC 2503 .
  
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    CPSC 4453 Special Topics II

    3 credits
    Advanced programming techniques and theories currently implemented in a variety of computer sicence disciplines.
  
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    CPSC 4523 Advanced Web-Site Design

    3 credits
    Advanced concepts and elements of web-site design. Advanced web-page editors are used to build the web pages. Online research and analysis provide the foundation for building a small enterprise environment group project. Recommended prerequisites: CPSC 3103  and CPSC 4303 .
  
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    CPSC 4603 Advanced Business Solutions (Project)

    3 credits
    Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing and permission of coordinator of studies in Department of Computer Science.
  
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    CPSC 4613 Advanced Application Development

    3 credits
    Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing and permission of coordinator of studies in Department of Computer Science.
  
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    CPSC 4623 Special Topics in Internet Computing

    3 credits
    Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing and permission of coordinator of studies in Department of Computer Science.
  
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    CPSC 4700 Internship with Business

    Variable credit
    Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing and permission of coordinator of studies in Department of Computer Science. Students must also meet the university’s requirements for Senior Practicum. Competency in computer, math, oral communication, reading, and writing.

Criminal Justice

  
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    CRJS 1001 Cornerstone in Criminal Justice

    1 credit
    This course introduces freshmen Criminal Justice majors with less than 30 hours to the Criminal Justice discipline: its values, mission, goals, and expectations. Special emphasis is given to how Christians relate to this subculture in order to have a transformational effect on justice. The course will briefly introduce students to the expectations of the major, occupational opportunities within criminal justice, the use of APA in writing assignments, and the value of servant leadership.
  
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    CRJS 1151 Introduction to Handguns

    1 credit
    This course introduces the basic knowledge, skills, and attitude necessary for owning and using a pistol safely. The course will be taught by an NRA certified instructor. Each student has the opportunity to receive a certificate of completion for the NRA Basic Pistol Course. As skill level permits, students may participate in the shooting of air guns, rim fire and center fire pistols.
  
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    CRJS 1253 Introduction to Criminal Justice

    3 credits
    The history and philosophy of crime and criminal justice, including Christian perspectives, the agencies and processes that comprise the criminal justice system, and the relationship between the U.S. constitution and the criminal-justice system.
  
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    CRJS 2103 Introduction to Corrections

    3 credits
    An introduction and analysis of American correctional systems with emphasis on the community-based agencies, institutional philosophies, inmate demographics/behavior, and an examination of the correctional officer’s role and correctional legislation. Prerequisite: CRJS 2153  
  
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    CRJS 2153 Firearms for Criminal Justice and Forensic Science

    3 credits
    This course will introduce skills necessary for handling firearms for law enforcement certification, crime scene processing, and forensic analysis. Basic knowledge and procedures for firearms analysis will be instructed for handguns, long guns, cartridge components, and gunshot residue analyses. Practical exercises, microscopic analysis, and review analytical theory will be required. Prerequisite: CRJS 1151  
  
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    CRJS 2173 Health and Fitness for Criminal Justice

    3 credits
    This course will explore the physical, emotional, and spiritual demands experienced by a criminal justice professional. It introduces healthy and responsible approaches for developing lifelong actives for physical health, emotional health, and spiritual health as a criminal justice professional.
  
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    CRJS 2283 Police and Community

    3 credits
    Explores strategies of community policing and ways to manage police work when it conflicts with constituencies within the community. Prerequisite: CRJS 1253  
  
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    CRJS 3353 Juveniles and the Law

    3 credits
    This course investigates the juvenile justice system; examining initial custody to disposition from a historical, modern and criminological perspectives.
  
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    CRJS 3403 Courts and Procedure

    3 credits
    This course is a study of the workings and structure of the United States Court System.  Students will study both federal and state court systems.  Additionally, students will study the concepts of jurisdiction, appeals, evidence and procedure, including the actual structure of a trial.
  
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    CRJS 3413 Criminal Law

    3 credits
    A study of criminal law in the United States. Addresses legal definitions of crime; purposes and functions of the law; historical foundations, and the limits of the criminal law. Prerequisite: CRJS 1253   
  
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    CRJS 3433 Criminal Justice Management

    3 credits
    This course applies general principles of management to criminal-justice settings. Special emphasis is placed on human-resource issues, the supervision of autonomous street personnel, and management ethics. Prerequisite: CRJS 1253  
  
  •  

    CRJS 3453 Criminal Investigation

    3 credits
    Introduces students to techniques of crime-scene analysis and subsequent investigation. Prerequisite: CRJS 1253  
  
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    CRJS 3470 Special Topics in Criminal Justice

    Variable Credit (1-3 Hours)
    Periodic offering of special topics in criminal justice emphasizes specialized areas with practical or public-policy significance. Examples of possible courses include fingerprinting, use of COMSTAT mapping procedures, and restorative justice. Courses range from one to three hours, and a total of six hours of special topics courses may count toward the criminal justice major.
  
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    CRJS 4203 Police Tactics

    3 credits
    This course acquaints students with the various tactics used by patrol officers.  Students will explore the proper use of deadly force, tactical approaches to unknown risk and high-risk situations and suspects, and the correct procedures for building and vehicle searches.  Additionally, students will learn how to de-escalate situations through the use of verbal judo and protect themselves in CQB (close quarter battle). Prerequisite:  CRJS 2283 .
  
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    CRJS 4233 Terrorism

    3 credits
    This course examines terrorism and the response to this threat (i.e., counterterrorism).  Students will explore broad themes and topics relevant to terrorist attacks including:  defining terrorism, religious terrorism, domestic terrorism, terrorist motives, strategies & organizations, use of weapons of mass destruction, strategies for combating terrorism, intelligence collecting, and anti-terrorism awareness training.  The goal of the course is to develop a shared understanding and intellectual framework that can assist students in understanding this critical subject.
  
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    CRJS 4243 Profiling

    3 credits
    This course is intended to provide students with a functioning knowledge of criminal profiling issues and techniques.  Students will explore issues relating to the validity and ability of criminal profiling as an investigative technique as applied to serial killers, the differences between prospective and retrospective profiling, problems associated with profiling school shooters, and issues surrounding racial profiling.
  
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    CRJS 4253 Criminological Theories

    3 credits
    This course is a study of the various theories of criminal causation and control, the identification of criminal typologies and the reaction of society to crime and criminals. Prerequisite: SOSC 1003 .
  
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    CRJS 4300 Independent Study

    Variable (1-3 credits)
    Independent study of special topics is established at the request of the student and faculty member when special needs or circumstances arise (e.g., when a highly disciplined and capable student desires to engage in directed research of subject matter not otherwise included in the academic program or when students may need 1 to 3 credit hours to graduate and no other course options are feasible).  This course may be taken for 1, 2, or 3 credit hours.  Note:  By arrangement with the instructor and approval of advisor.
  
  •  

    CRJS 4703 Capstone in Criminal Justice Studies

    3 credits
    This course requires seniors to use theoretical perspectives from criminology and other criminal justice-related areas to formulate a policy-related question pertaining to the study of crime, criminality, and/or responses to crime and criminality.  The student will develop an original research topic, develop and administer a survey instrument, collect and analyze data, and report the findings of his or her research in the form of a major term paper and executive summary oral presentation.  Skills and concepts developed in previous classes form the foundation for this course. Prerequisites:  SEMR 2153  , RSCH 3803  , STAT 3203  , and CRJS 4253  .
  
  •  

    CRJS 4803 Practicum in Criminal Justice Studies

    3 credits
    An internship practicum is a supervised work experience with selected law firms, law enforcement agencies, correctional agencies, or non profit organizations designed to give students real world experience in a particular area of criminal justice. Prerequisite:  Approval of the CJ program director or internship coordinator.

Economics

  
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    ECON 2053 Microeconomics

    3 credits
    An introduction to economic analysis and its applications to business issues. Emphasis on consumer demand, theory of the firm, and resource markets.
  
  •  

    ECON 2063 Macroeconomics

    3 credits
    An application of economic analysis to the national economy. Emphasis on national income, business cycles, price levels, unemployment, fiscal and monetary policy.
  
  •  

    ECON 2103 Personal Finance

    3 credits
    Emphasizes comprehensive personal financial planning through the use of an integrative case that gives practical experience in decision-making. Topics include budgeting, investments, insurance, major purchase decisions, etc.
  
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    ECON 2203 Environmental Economics

    3 credits
    An exploration of the economic bases of environmental issues and policies including property rights, externalities, and the common-property basis of environmental problems. Other policies are analyzed, involving such issues as air and water pollution, solid-waste disposal, hazardous substances, wilderness preservation, and the protection of endangered species.
  
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    ECON 3053 Managerial Economics

    3 credits
    The use of mathematics to relate economic theory to practical managerial scenarios.  The course will utilize economic principles to make decisions under uncertainty. Prerequisites:  ECON 2053  and BUSI 3503 .
  
  •  

    ECON 3063 Money and Banking

    3 credits
    Introduction to the role of money and banking in financial markets.  Topics include monetary theory, monetary policy, the central banking system and the US commercial banking system. Prerequisite:  ECON 2063 .
  
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    ECON 3163 Development Economics

    3 credits
    This course will discuss economic conditions that are unique to the economy of developing countries as well as identify and analyze macroeconomic issues, concepts and theories about the (proximate and ultimate) causes, proposed solutions and the implications of underdevelopment.  The course will also survey and evaluate historical approaches and current trends towards alleviating poverty, as well as the unique investment challenges and opportunities for businesses in the developing countries. Prerequisites:  ECON 2053  and ECON 2063  
  
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    ECON 3253 Strategic Decision Making

    3 credits
    This course focuses on strategic responses to interdependent decisions.  This course will introduce concepts from gamer theory and other decision making techniques in order to better understand how decisions are made with applications in business, economics and politics. Prerequisite:  BUSI 3503 .
  
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    ECON 4003 Studies In Economics

    Variable (1-3 credits)
    An investigation of economics topics not covered in traditional courses by critical evaluation of assigned readings. One to Three credit hours. Prerequisite: Junior standing.
 

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